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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  January 22, 2018 9:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello, it is monday, it is nine o'clock. welcome to the programme. the head of the army speaks out on defence funding in a rare public intervention. general sir nick carter will warn of the potential threat posed by russian long—range missiles and cyber warfare skills. his call for more money has been welcomed by military colleagues. there is a russian threat out there. i visited russia last year for the may day parade. i found that their capability was awesome. not only in the conventional side, but also, as we know, the developments in the cyber and high technology. large numbers of young women say they are too embarrassed to go for a smear test, putting themselves at risk of cervical cancer. i've not met a woman yet who didn't say they were embarrassed, so i did put lots of things in front of mine. i'll clean house, i'll go shopping, anything not to go. you know, it is very embarrassing. we will ask agp what more can be
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done to improve uptake. we will also talk a mother whose daughter swallowed a small button battery, as doctors warn of a spike in cases and life changing injuries that can result from it. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning. we're also talking about social media this morning as a report suggests that we're falling out of love with it. concerns about fake news, social anxiety and cyber bullying are partly to blame. let us know if you've deleted your accounts, or if you're just using social media less. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag #victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today... the head of the army will warn today that britain's military risks falling behind that of its enemies unless it gets additional investment. in a speech to the defence think tank, the royal united services institute, general sir nick carter is expected to say that russia now has superior
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battlefield capabilities to the uk, and poses a significant threat in terms of cyber warfare. simon clemison reports. images showing what russia said was a strike on syria. but the rockets come not from the mediterranean sea, but the caspian sea, more than 900 miles away. the head of the army warns russia is building an increasingly aggressive military, which the uk is struggling to match. russia has also been simulating attacks closer to home, conducting large—scale exercises. this, the heavily armed klinongrad bordering lithuania. general sir nick carter will warn britain must take notice of what is going on around us and keep up, or we could be massively constrained. he will say the threats are not thousands of miles away, but are now on our doorstep. he says cyber warfare can also disrupt the lives of normal people. one of the most important aspects is to deter any aggression.
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you can only do that with a strong army and forward presence. you need the back—up to sustain that. that means a significant size in terms of the army and any thought of reducing the army below the numbers that we have at the moment, about 80,000, i think would put it at risk. the head of the army is not saying this in so many words, but one way to avoid the possibility of britain falling behind in combat could be more money from the chancellor here at numberii. he certainly won't want to see any cuts. the speech will be made with the approval of the defence secretary, who has already said a 2% rise should be a base, not a ceiling. no word yet from the chancellor. simon cleminson, bbc news. more on that later. annita mcveigh is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the days news.
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a charity says one in three young women in the uk are embarrassed to attend smear tests for cervical cancer because of issues with body image. jo's cervical cancer trust, which surveyed more than 2000 women aged between 25 and 35, said it was worried about the impact on screening rates, which have fallen to a 20—year low. the key finding that has come out is that one in three women that have been researched say that body image is a very significant factor for not attending cervical screening. that's a big concern. for those under 35 it's the most common cancer, and if women aren't attending cervical screening then potentially their lives will be put at risk. ukip‘s deputy leader has resigned in protest over henry bolton's decision to step down as party leader. mep margot parker, who'll remain with the party, says mr bolton has left the party in "limbo" after refusing to go, despite receiving a vote of no confidence from ukip's national executive committee. mr bolton faces repeated calls to quit over offensive text messages sent by his former girlfriend.
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lord 0'neill says that economy should perform better this year than many opponents of brexit had predicted. he said it should be upgraded because of increased demand from america, china and continental europe. detectives are continuing to investigate the fatal stabbing of an 8—year—old girl in the west midlands. mylee billingham was named by police as the schoolgirl who died at an address near walsall on saturday night. a 54—year—old man, who was arrested in connection with the attack, remains in a critical condition in hospital. borisjohnson will meet his us counterpart rex tillerson in london today for talks on syria, iran and yemen. it comes after donald trump refused to visit the uk to open the new us embassy. donald trump may not be coming to
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britain, but his secretary of state is. rex tillerson arrived for a fresh round of diplomacy in european capitals. america's foreign policy chief is expected to visit the new us embassy in london on the one the president said he doesn't like, and try to smooth ruffled feathers by offering the now ritual reassurances about the importance of the uk and us relationship. but in his meetings with boris johnson and us relationship. but in his meetings with borisjohnson and senior security officials, mr tillerson is also expected to seek common ground on key international issues. on syria, there will discuss not only the new turkish assault on kurdish forces in the north, but also upcoming meetings in geneva and elsewhere to seek yet again some kind of political solution to the conflict. mr tillerson also wants to discuss iran, where britain and europe are at odds with the us over the deal to restrict teheran‘s ukip
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—— nuclear programme. it looks set to look into ways to curb the nuclear process. both sides will wa nt to nuclear process. both sides will want to talk about yemen, the fighting and the humanitarian system continues to get worse, in what has become a proxy war between iran and saudi arabia. attention, as ever, will focus on the uk and us relationship, that is being tested by donald trump's apparent indifference and reluctance to visit. today's diplomacy will prepare the way for the president's meeting with the prime minister theresa may, which is expected in the swiss resort of davos next week. the us federal government will remain closed today after the senate delayed a vote on a budget measure, which would have allowed civil servants to go back to work. democrats want president trump to negotiate over immigration, but republicans say no deal is possible while federal government services are closed. the last government shutdown was in 2013, and lasted for 16 days. authorities in mexico say more than
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25,000 people were murdered in the country last year, about 500 every week. the majority were in states where drug cartels are deeply entrenched. mexico city and the tourist areas of baja california also saw murder rates rise 400%. kaymer kennelly 1000 children centres kaymer kennelly1000 children centres a re kaymer kennelly1000 children centres are crossing and have not been inspected by 0fsted for more than five years. the government temporarily suspended inspections in 2015. the charity action for children says it has left thousands of pa rents children says it has left thousands of parents with no idea how good their local centre is. for babies and toddlers, it is a chance to play. for parents, a chance to socialise and get free support from health workers. there are 3000 or so children's centres across england. like schools, 0fsted inspects them for safety and quality. in 2015, the government decided to consult over their future and told inspectors to stop inspecting. the charity action for children says two years on, some 969 centres due an inspection have not had one.
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that is 40% of the total. in that time, councils have invested £1.11 billion in children's centres, but it is not clear how well the money has been spent. what it means is that local authorities under pressure for cash, if the centres are not inspected, they are sort of invisible. what that means is that it is much easier to close them. two years ago, alka lost her mother just after giving birth to her son and was heading towards depression. at the centres were not here to help me, and the health visitor, one consistent person throughout to help me, i'm not sure how we would have coped, and i don't think we would have coped very well. these centres are a lifeline. 0fsted confirmed that the inspections are still suspended. the department for education said robust and regular partial inspections do still take place. a man's been rescued after a week of being cut off by the snow.
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the 64—year—old, who lives in dumfries and galloway, had been attempting to reach the nearest village, but his path was blocked by deep snow. a mountain rescue team tried to drive to him, but had to abandon the car and go on foot to help him. they finally managed to reach the man after battling through drifts for two hours. gary 0ldman has cemented his status as favourite to win an oscar this year after being awarded best actor at the screen actors guild awards. it's for his role as winston churchill in the darkest hour. he was overcome with emotion as he received his prize. churchill reminds us we make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give. and you have given, you have given enormously tonight. iamso i am so deeply honoured and proud to receive this magnificent award. perhaps a golden statue in his hands
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next time round 7 time to get an sport. let's talk about the australian open, kyle edmund has some decent company? we are whittling down the numbers. after his success yesterday, incredible, through to his first grand slam quarterfinal, the biggest win of his career. there is another name you might know. roger federer through to the quarter finals of the austrailian 0pen beocming the oldest man to reach the last eight since ken rosewell in 1977. that was the grand age of 36! he beat hungary's marton fucsovics in straight sets, making quick work of him too in under two hours. he'll face czech tomas berdych next. and in the women's draw top seed
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simona halep beat naomi 0saka after coming through a tight first set she ran away with it 6—3, 6—2. and she goes on to face the winner of the all czech contest between sixth seed karolina pliskova and 20th seed barbora strycova. novak djokovic, also bidding for his place. but standing in the way, the south korean 21—year—old, hyeon chung. already shaping up to be an exciting match. and the masters has a new champion in the snigger? what a performance from northern ireland's mark allen, in what was arguably the biggest contest of his career. he beat kyren wilson to triumph 10—7 in the final of the masters at alexandra palace. remember, he had to beat the likes of ronnie 0'sullivan and john higgins to get to the last two. but a0 years since alex higgins won his first masters title allen has followed in his footsteps after last night's marathon match
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which in the end lasted five hours and 1a minutes! he walks away with the paul hunter trophy of course and £200,000 in prize money. devastating though for kyren wilson who was in tears afterwards, he is of course the first player born in the 1990s to appear in a triple crown. you could see what it meant to him. close to tears, we can understand. but you should hold ahead of really high. -- but you should hold ahead of really high. —— your head up. but you should hold ahead of really high. -- your head up. i've had an incredible week. i said to my manager and my coach, incredible week. i said to my managerand my coach, if incredible week. i said to my manager and my coach, if anybody was going to beat me, i would have loved it to have been mark. i am devastated. but he deserves it, he has been knocking on the door.
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incredible what two are doing for the sport. kyren said it was nice to go into pizza express and have people asking for his autograph. a lot of people tweeting about ths yesterday. strong selfie gain in football. there has been a lot of talk about this transfer, alexis sanchez. if ever we needed confirmation, standing on the pitch in his number 7 shirt, taking a selfie. and he is not the only one. somebody else that once wore that number seven shirt is cristiano ronaldo. after cristiano ronaldo scored twice during real madrid's 7—1 thrashing over deportivo he did get a boot to the face, but couldn't quite wait to get to the changing rooms to check the results, borrowing his physio's phone to check out the damage. nobody had a mirror handy. what have
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you got? an iphone. he wasn't happy with what he saw either. he might be starting something, i was checking my make—up on my phone earlier and i was accused of doing a visteon ronaldo! you —— a cristiano ronaldo. cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women under 35 and easily treatable if it's found early. but a new study has found that a third of young women are avoiding getting smear tests because they are too embarrassed to show their bodies to doctors. the cervical cancer charity jo's cervical cancer trust surveyed 2000 women under 35 and found that in some areas, half of them were ignoring invitations to be screened. 35% said this was because of their body shape. while more than a third were worried about the look and smell of their pubic areas. 220,000 british women of all ages are diagnosed with cervical abnormalities each year. and just under a thousand women die
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from cervical cancer every year in the uk. with us in the studio is robert music from jo's cervical cancer trust, tina holland will tell us why she didn't go for smear test, and gp dr philippa kaye is here too. thank you to joining thank you tojoining us. robert, it's your organisation who carried out the research. shocking to hear that so many women don't go for their smear test because they are worried about their body image. it's really worrying. we've known for a long time that embarrassment is one of the factors. the results from this data is very concerning. body image has come up as such a huge image has come up as such a huge image as it has done beforehand. this body —— this age group. we've got to find a way of reassuring
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them. making sure they were aware that this test is vitally important and it is the most common cancer for their age group. we are really worried if things don't turn around and unfortunately more women will be diagnosed and sadly lose their lives. the key thing this cancer is preve nta ble. lives. the key thing this cancer is preventable. it so many women, such a crucial test for them to get to diagnose them in the early stages, and if we're hearing that they would rather go to a gym class or get their waxing done then both for their waxing done then both for their smear test, what barriers, what can be done to remove some of those barriers? i think educational awareness. making that age group understand that this is a test that is very relevant for them. but every three years they get invited, it's a five—minute test but those five minutes can literally save their lives. what's very important and has come out in the research is that they don't understand about the risk
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of cervical cancer so that's very important as well. one of the things we are calling for is a national awareness campaign to make this acceptable. we need to start very young. when they start having their personal and social education as children in primary school and they learn about their bodies, we should be teaching them about breast examination, testicular examination and the importance of smear tests. if it is delivered from very early on that this is part of your self care, in the same way you brush your teeth and you wash your face, but it becomes part of everyday life. i think it needs to start there and we need to have a bigger push on social media. we need to be pushing on social media in the same way you think about contraception and sexual health, we should be using those opportunities to have a smear test. wheels any to talk about what happens when you get there. people are frightened. we will come onto that. let's bring in tina. thank you
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for joining that. let's bring in tina. thank you forjoining us. let's ask you why you didn't give your smear test. forjoining us. let's ask you why you didn't give your smear testm was something i didn't find the time for. i think if you're in pain, you've got something going on that you've got something going on that you think you need to get checked, then you go to the doctor. for something that you don't necessarily have symptoms, it's just something that you don't necessarily have symptoms, it'sjust something you put to one side, which i regret doing. why do you regret it? i eventually went for my smear test and unfortunately i found that i had cervical cancer. it was the early stages which was very, very lucky. if i'd left it any longer it could have been a different story. if i'd have been a different story. if i'd have gone sooner it would have prevented me getting cancer rather than the cells changing into cancer. teen comedy recognise what we are hearing from the today, that women are put off because they are embarrassed about their bodies,
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embarrassed about their bodies, embarrassed about their bodies, embarrassed about how they look, about smell, they would rather do other things than go for a smear test and find any excuse not to go? it's an intimate part of a woman's body, and people get embarrassed i think. like you say, smells, the look and somebody else seeing that area. but every female has got one and, you know, the specialist that does the smear test have seen a variety of them. there's nothing to be embarrassed about at all. we even hear that women won't go unless they've shaved or waxed in that area as well. again, everybody is different, everybody's preferences are different. the nurses, the gynaecologist that do the tests have seen gynaecologist that do the tests have seen it all and will see worse, better, every time they do a test. it's nothing to be worried about,
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nothing to be embarrassed about, and it saves your life and it helps prevent cancer. i recommend everybody getting it done. is there anything looking back that would have helped you, that would have maybe encouraged you to go sooner?” think i'm site is a wonderful thing. i think knowing and having the knowledge that it's there to prevent you cancer, not to diagnosed cancer, it is there to diagnose the changes in your cervix not actually detecting cancer. yes, it does detecting cancer. yes, it does detect cancer but it's there to help prevent it. it's one of the cancers that can be prevented with a smear test and cervical screening. if i'd have had more knowledge of that at the time i think i would have gone sooner. thank you. can you talk us through the procedure. it's not necessarily just about detecting
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cancer, it's about detecting abnormalities. it doesn't actually diagnose cancer and i wonder if some people don't go because they are terrified that they are going to be diagnosed with cancer. it detects precancerous changes and we can do something about those changes before it turns into cancer. i think we need to push the message of it doesn't mean that you have cancer. some of those changes will go away on their own some of those changes will go away on theirown and some of those changes will go away on their own and some won't. so this is what we do. when you go to the doctor, it's a date that you are not bleeding. that's quite important when you're planning. this is a spectrum. there's a definite fear of the big old—fashioned metal cold speculums. not all of that goes inside. if you can tolerate sex, you can tolerate that. we put it inside and open it up a bit to hold the walls of the joiner out of the way.
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we are looking down the sensor we can see the cervix through the hole. —— the walls of the vagina out of the way. we use this to swipe the walls of the vagina. that bit sometimes causes period pain. how uncomfortable is that? it depends person—to—person. some people find the stretching uncomfortable and some people are more prone to period pain than others. that lasts a few seconds. this brush then goes in a pot. this comes out and you're done. two minutes, that's all. it's potentially life—saving. is it present? no. is it uncomfortable? yes. it is absolutely necessary —— is it pleasant? no. think about relaxing your bottom down into the bed, that. you can sync against the
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speculum. you're explaining it in a way that makes it sound less terrifying but what can doctors and nurses do to make that situation more comfortable for women? we are lucky that you come and see your nurse and hopefully you have a relationship with your nurse and your doctor, that you get to know them overa them over a few years. that relationship is really helpful. you may not. absolutely. all of us and all of the nurses are very used to doing this. we are trained in doing this and we are used a calming down nervous women. we appreciate it's not comfortable, we have it done ourselves. part of ourjob is to relax people. makes it easier from ourend as relax people. makes it easier from our end as well but the message needs to come out that we can pick up needs to come out that we can pick up precancerous changes. you can have treatment, that will save your life. it doesn't affect fertility if we early. people are worried about that. if we treat you early you shouldn't have any problems later
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on. we don't think about appearances and smells, the patient over there said they'd seen better or worse. i wouldn't even think about it in those terms. it is what it is. we are all different. absolutely. we have to think about sexual health. people are worried about the number of partners they've had, people are worried will make judgments. we don't, we are using that information for the best treatment and care. one viewers as i'm puzzled by the objective embarrassed. uncomfortable, inconvenient but extremely important. is this what happens when we distort women's body image? tina, what would your message be to people watching at home? image? tina, what would your message be to people watching at home7m saved my life. don't put it off. go and get it checked and good luck. tina, thank you. thank you both as well. crewe alexandra football club had an arrangement with former coach
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barry bennell to let players as young as 11 years old stay in his house overnight, his trial has heard. the 64—year—old is accused of sexually abusing 11 boys between 1979 and 1991. 0ur reporterjim reed was at liverpool crown court on friday. jim. this is the trial of barry bennell. former youth football coach linked toa number of former youth football coach linked to a number of large professional clu bs, to a number of large professional clubs, including crewe alexandra and manchester city. he's facing 48 cou nts manchester city. he's facing 48 counts of historical sexual abuse which he denies. on friday the court heard from a former youth team player at crewe alexandra. he said he was 11 or 12 when he first became linked to the club. this was in the early 1980s. the jury were linked to the club. this was in the early 1980s. thejury were played linked to the club. this was in the early 1980s. the jury were played a police interview with this man. in it he talked about trips he made to the north—west of england with his family, with his dad. he said it was
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there his dad used to leave him and he would stay overnight at barry bennell's house. he alleges he was seriously abused. he said between 12 and 20 times. he was asked in the interview whose idea was it to stay in barry bennell's house. the alleged victim replied, the football club. by that he meant crewe alexandra. it would have been dario he went on to tell officers about the house itself. he described how barry bennell used to play horror movies to young children. he mentioned nightmare on elm street. he said you'd be that scared, you'd wa nt to he said you'd be that scared, you'd want to cuddle up to him. he told police this arrangement lasted for about 18 months until he went to stay at dario gradi's house. he said dario looked after me, i always grew up dario looked after me, i always grew up thinking dario saved me from
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barry bennell. he was asked why did this arrangement change, why did you stop being in barry bennell's care and start to be in dario gradi's care, he said he didn't remember. what did he say about the impact on his life? this alleged victim talked about how when he was 18 or 19, he said he had a panic attack. he got taken to hospital. at that point he said he told his father about the alleged abuse and what he said barry bennell had been doing. he said he didn't know what happened to the complaint, it didn't seem to go any further. what happened under cross—examination? further. what happened under cross-examination? eleanor laws qc is representing mr bennell in this case. he was asked about a positive character reference that he a p pa re ntly character reference that he apparently gave for him in the late 19805. apparently gave for him in the late 1980s. he also talked about a police statement that he gave in 1998. in this police statement he apparently said he was never the victim of
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abuse. he said he denied it then because of embarrassment. he was repeatedly asked about possible financial compensation and he said, i don't need any money, all i want is closure. he said he couldn't rule out claiming damages in the future. mr bennell denies 48 counts of abuse and this trial will continue at 10:30am. thank you. still to come. a campaign to stop the convicted rapistjohn worboys from being able to live in london — after he's released from prison. and the long—term health dangers of babies and toddlers accidentally swallowing lithium batteries. time for the latest news — here's annita. the bbc news headlines this morning... the head of the army will warn today that britain's military risks falling behind that of its enemies unless it gets additional investment. in a speech to the defence think tank, the royal united services institute, general sir nick carter is expected to say that russia now has superior battlefield capabilities to the uk, and poses a significant threat
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in terms of cyber warfare. his comments have been authorised by the defence secretary. a charity says one in three young women in the uk are embarrassed to attend smear tests for cervical cancer because of issues with body image. jo's cervical cancer trust, which surveyed more than 2000 women aged between 25 and 35, said it was worried about the impact on screening rates, which have fallen to a 20—year low. ukip's deputy leader has resigned in protest over henry bolton's decision not to step down as party leader. mep margot parker says mr bolton has left the party in "limbo" after refusing to go, despite receiving a vote of no confidence from ukip's national executive committee. mr bolton faces repeated calls to quit over offensive text messages sent by his former girlfriend. former treasury minister and remain
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supporter lord 0'neill says the british economy should perform better this year than many opponents of brexit had predicted. he said uk growth forecasts were likely to be upgraded because of increased demand from china, america and continental europe. detectives are continuing to investigate the fatal stabbing an eight—year—old girl in the west midlands. mylee billingham was named by police as the schoolgirl who died atan by police as the schoolgirl who died at an address near walsall on saturday. a 54—year—old man, understood to be herfather, was arrested in connection with the attack. he remains in a critical condition in hospital. the us federal government will remain closed after the senate delayed a vote on a budget measure which would have allowed civil serva nts to which would have allowed civil servants to go back to work. democrats want president trump to negotiate over immigration. republicans say no deal is possible while the federal government services are closed. the last government shutdown was in 2013 and for16 government shutdown was in 2013 and for 16 days. gary 0ldman has cemented his status as favourite to win an oscar this year. he won the award for best actor at the screen actors guild awards overnight. it's for his role as sir winston
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churchill in the darkest hour that is a summary of the latest bbc news. lets get some sport now. coming up on sport tina — familiarity won't be breeding contempt for roger federer as the defending champion lines up for his fifth australian open match against long—time rival tomas berdych. mark allen hopes his masters victory over kyren wilson will lead to bigger and better things. his 10—7 victory makes him the first northern irishman to win the masters since dennis taylor back in 1987. and with alexis sanchez set to join manchester united from arsenal in a swa p manchester united from arsenal in a swap deal in the coming days, he has been spotted with the number 7 shirt at old trafford. he will pass
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and fresh from her victory at the weekend, lizzy yarnold will lead the skeleton team at the winter games next month. more on all of those stories in 30 minutes. the head of the army will warn today that britain's military capability could fall behind that of potential enemies without extra investment. in a speech to the royal united services institute, general sir nick carter will point to russia's growing battlefield capabilities, and the threat posed by cyber warfare. this appeal is being made with the approval of the defence secretary, gavin williamson, who's made clear he wants more cash from the treasury. we were supposed to be speaking to chris parry, a former officer with the royal navy. i don't think we
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have the skype line, but we should be able to speak to him. let me check you are there. good morning, chris? we are having problems with that line, i'm afraid. chris, can you hear me? we will come back to that story when we get him. in the meantime, ican that story when we get him. in the meantime, i can read you a message that has come in on the story we have been talking about this morning. 0ur have been talking about this morning. our top story, morning. 0urtop story, cervical cancer. lisa on facebook says i am overweight and have no body confidence. i hate the thought of having to go for a smear test, but i would rather go through a couple of minutes of embarrassment, instead of being diagnosed with cervical cancer and risk being taken away from my children, leaving them without them. come on, ladies, it takes a couple of minutes and could potentially save your life. that is in response
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to the discussion we have been having this morning, findings from research that has told us that women are not going to get their smear tests because they are embarrassed about their bodies. another message has come in from severe. she says, i am 33 and i have never missed a smear test. i don't and why women don't go for one. the nurses are so amazing and putting you at ease and so dignified. it is mind—boggling women are happy to have a brazilian wax but not a test. women need to grow up a little bit. please keep your messages coming in on that story or anything we're talking about this morning. we could not get hold of chris, but we will move onto another story we covering this morning. a leading surgeon says that small button batteries should be classified as poisons, because they are so dangerous. kate cross says she is worried that the message is not getting through to parents. a
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dutch surgeon said she treated three babies and toddlers in just one week, and that was re—tweeted thousands of times. if swallowed, the batteries, they are typically small, round and silver, they can cause serious damage to the patient will stop in some cases, it can be fatal. they are used in things like children's poise, electronic car keys and other household devices. they are also found in toys for household pets. we can speak now to kate cross who is a surgeon at great 0rmond street. also here is rosie nicholson, and her 5—year—old daughter freya. freya swallowed a lithium battery just before her first birthday. and we can hearfrom sheila merrill in cambridgeshire, who is a public health adviser for the royal society for the prevention of accidents. thank you forjoining us this morning. i want to start with you. how bad is the problem? with me? oh, sorry. with freya ?
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how bad is the problem? with me? oh, sorry. with freya? she swallowed it about two weeks before her first birthday and it was in there for five weeks and we didn't know. she was choking at every meal and i was really concerned about that. i was slapping her on the back. when it first happened, it looked like flu symptoms. she was cold and very upset. we took her to the doctor five or six times over that course, she was on three different brands of antibiotics, still throwing up. i was saying these concerns to the surgeon, to the gp. as a mother, you wa nt to surgeon, to the gp. as a mother, you want to trust your instincts. but when nobody else is supporting that, you question yourself a little bit. eventually, she did choke properly and lost her breath when we were out shopping. i was able to back slap
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her and get it out, then i took it into a&e. i'm so sorry to hear that. do you remember that, freya? kind of. what do you remember of that day? i was lying down and the doctors did an x—ray on me. day? i was lying down and the doctors did an x-ray on me. how long passed from the moment he first started sorting out differences in freya, to that incident? a couple of hours a day, maybe. i can't exactly remember the timeline. we never imagined it would be a button battery. it was from one of the scales on our bathroom floor.m battery. it was from one of the scales on our bathroom floor. it had fallen out? she was playing with the scale, i didn't even think it has button batteries come i didn't know anything about this at the time. the covering for the batteries comes off
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very easily. we didn't know that this was even a problem. and you have got children on the floor when you're getting ready, you are busy and they are busy. when we found out, obviously it is still quite horrifying to think about how lucky we were. and also terrifying, that moment when you see your daughter choking? yes. it was. when you are telling the gp and the doctor what is happening, they say, it is croup, they are diagnosing different things, you start to doubt yourself. do you now understand how dangerous they are? yes. kate, how serious is this problem? a very serious problem, and freya has been very lucky. that is fantastic. most children can be lucky, that you
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don't know that necessarily it has been swallowed. children that are one or two cannot tell you that is what happened. as you say, the button batteries are in so many things. kitchen scales, toys, remote controls, vr headsets, watches. most houses will have batteries that have been taken out of those and put in a drawer, and even the old batteries can cause problems. if they fall on the floor behind the sofa, children exploring the world can easily get those and put them in them out. it isa those and put them in them out. it is a real problem. just to follow on from that, my youngest daughter then got a light from her scooter when she was one and a half, came to me with two small button batteries in her hand that she had pulled apart. even after going through that, still not realising how accessible these
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are to children and how easily avoidable it is, my husband and i started a petition on the government website, looking for signatures, because it would be so simple to get quantum coating to make them safe. what does that mean? it is a coating that means that the charges of the battery will only work if the acree is squeezed, on a spring. —— the battery. that should just be governed regulation, as well as having a child protective covering for anything that uses the batteries, because the plus and negative charges so close to each other, they do produce a poison that can erode the oesophagus and cause death or lifelong injuries. we were really lucky to come out. we know it isa really lucky to come out. we know it is a serious problem if it happens. can you give us a sense of the scale? how many cases have you dealt with, do you know how many there are? one of the problems in the uk is that we don't know how any cases
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there are nationally. in the united states, the poisons database system re cord states, the poisons database system record all button battery ingestion is, because it is regarded to be a poison and to be so dangerous. but we don't have a similar mechanism of recording it in the uk. it is each individual hospital that deals with children that will have their own caseload, but it is not all been brought together and linked up. we brought together and linked up. we brought this, with the bbc, to greater attention back in 2016. we we re greater attention back in 2016. we were seeing two three children per month coming with significant injuries from button battery ingestion is. since that, there has beena ingestion is. since that, there has been a greater awareness. we are still seeing one or two children every two to three months, too many. particularly when some of these children are having a life changing injuries and we have children that are coming back to the hospital and have to have more than 50 different operations to try to correct the damage that has happened because they have swallowed a battery. let's bring in sheila. good morning. is
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this about raising awareness?m bring in sheila. good morning. is this about raising awareness? it is about raising awareness, yes. we do hear about children on a frequent basis actually swallowing his batteries. as the previous person said, they do cause untold damage and distress to the parents. what we're doing is actually constantly raising awareness about the need to put them away, put them out of reach, well out of the reach of young children, particularly when young children, particularly when you are changing batteries, because it is so easy to put the old one down and forget to throw it away. again, we're talking about small lithium batteries. do they range in size, do they come in different sizes, can you give us, let us know what else they come in? they come in different sizes, they can be found
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in remote controls. particularly the much smaller remote controls, and they can be found in kitchen scales, bathroom scales, christmas cards, musical cards. a musical birthday ca rd musical cards. a musical birthday card is something that a child would find quite entertaining. it is so easy to give them something like that to play with, but the battery is inside and can be peeled out. they come in various sizes. i've got a card here, you can see all of the various sizes that they come in. some of them are so tiny that if you drop one, it is like dropping a little bead. it is difficult to find it. another example that i have got here, this is a little dangle for a dog collar. if you squeeze it, it flashes. if you unscrew that, which
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is so easy, there are two tiny button batteries in there. it is a case of being aware, the things that hold the button batteries, the actual equipment that has button batteries, and then they can so easily fall out if they are not actually fixed incorrectly or the back comes off. what should you do if you suspect a child has swallowed one? if you're worried a child or someone had swallowed a button battery, take them to a&e and tell them you think your child has swallowed a button battery. they need to do an x—ray and check. what is that? this is the battery that my daughter had swallowed. it's quite corroded around the edge, and how small it is. it was just sitting in around the edge, and how small it is. it wasjust sitting in her oesophagus. how does it feel to see that and to know that was inside you? it feels dirty. she had very
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high magnesium levels after the battery. we still had to go to the poisons clinic, there's a bit of damage in her oesophagus but it was able to heal and lucky it didn't perforate. we are very pleased you area perforate. we are very pleased you are a cave. thank you for sharing your story with us today. you've been getting in touch with us with your text messages. this text on the cervical cancer story, i can understand why young women avoid smear tests but believe me, a few minutes of discomfort is nothing compared with cancer. and we've had this tweet, i've booked mine today, please book ladies. this view says she's 35, she had one and it came back with abnormalities. she's been on the phone booking an appointment this morning. another viewer says in
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1972 a postnatal smear test saved my life. i've lived to see my children and grandchildren and now three great—grandchildren. please don't be embarrassed. and another viewer says smears are so important, my mum died ten yea rs smears are so important, my mum died ten years ago grieving my brother andi ten years ago grieving my brother and i heart broken, all because she missed a sneer and died of cervical cancer. don't be embarrassed, nurses do them to save your life —— missed a smear. thank you for all of your messages. campaigners opposed to the release from prison of black cab rapist john worboys are stepping up their efforts to ban him from living in london. there has been a fierce debate over whether or not worboys — who drugged, raped and sexually assaulted his passengers — still poses a risk to the public. but on friday the government said it would not challenge the decision to release him. two of worboys' victims will begin a legal challenge next week, while the mayor of london, sadiq khan, says he would look at bringing a separate review. 0ur
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our legal correspondent is here with all the details. good morning. can you run us through the key developments? the key development was on friday when the government said it wasn't going to seek a judicial review of the parole board decision. let's define what a judicial review is because there's a lot of confusion. it isn't an appeal of the parole board decision, it is simply an application to the court to scrutinise the lawfulness the process of that decision. the argument would be that either something has gone wrong during the process of making that decision, or that the decision itself was so irrational and unreasonable that no reasonable parole board could have come to that decision. the government having taken legal advice on that, thejustice secretary announced he felt it wouldn't be appropriate. clearly they were advised the prospect of success were not very high. as a result of that there has been some concern and
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activity over the weekend. it's been reported that 25 mps including the foreign secretary borisjohnson have written to the head of the parole board nick hardwick demanding that john warboys is not allowed to reside in london or come to london because that would be a betrayal of his victims. thejustice secretary said on friday also thatjohn warboys would not be released until his licence conditions had been finalised. at the moment he stays in prison, those conditions are being finalised. we know that there are two otherjudicial reviews. 0ne finalised. we know that there are two otherjudicial reviews. one is being taken by two of his victims, and you just mentioned that but also the mayor of london sadiq khan has instructed a senior lawyer to look into the possibility of a judicial review on the part of the mayor ‘s office. that's where we stand at the moment. david gauke announced there would be an overarching review of the way in which the parole board operates. this is not going to be
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retrospective, this isn't going to affect the decision, but importantly it will look at where the decisions of the parole board can be challenged and overturned, in a sort of freestanding mechanism. not this mechanism ofjudicial of freestanding mechanism. not this mechanism of judicial review. of freestanding mechanism. not this mechanism ofjudicial review. but whether we build into the parole system itself a mechanism for challenging the decisions. that's where we are at the moment. if the judicial review gets off the ground, both parties will need permission initially, if they get permission there will be an injunction put in place that. john warboys being released whilst those judicial reviews play out. at the moment that's where we are, he remains in prison, two potentialjudicial reviews and this overarching review of the entire system. thank you. we are joined of the entire system. thank you. we arejoined by mp of the entire system. thank you. we are joined by mp toby perkins, of the entire system. thank you. we arejoined by mp toby perkins, one of the mps who has raised concerns. we alsojoined by of the mps who has raised concerns.
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we also joined by chris from the end violence against women coalition. thank you forjoining us. what's your concern? our concerns are obvious. someone who should have beenin obvious. someone who should have been injailfor a great deal longer is going to be released. i think the demand for at least a judicial review of that parole board decision, so that we can see if the pa role decision, so that we can see if the parole boards decision was one that was a logical as many of us feel, at least will provide the scrutiny that is demanded —— that was illogical. the licensing conditions, given that mr warboys was a taxi driver and had the addresses of most of his victims, the condition that he shouldn't be allowed to travel into london will at least give a scintilla of peace of mind for some of those victims who must be going through absolute hell, reliving their appalling experiences of this
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man. even if he isn't in london, as has been requested by these mps who signed this letter, do you not think he could still be a threat to win in other parts of the country? of course he can. that's why he should be injail, i absolutely agree he should still be in jail. be injail, i absolutely agree he should still be injail. in the event that the justice secretary doesn't call for a judicial review, in the eventuality that he comes out, at least the existing victims who by and large have london addresses, that mr warboys in many cases is whereof, will have the peace of mind, the site peace of mind, that he isn't allowed to come into london and could be arrested if he does. you're absolutely right that in my view he could probably still pose a threat to the public safety elsewhere for new victims. i think at the very least, we owe existing victims that mr warboys is
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banned from coming into london. what's your response to this letter mps have written to nick hardwick the chairman of the parole board, saying that if warboys is released, we don't know when that will be, he shouldn't be allowed to live in the capital where his victims are in fear of their lives because he may have their home addresses? well, i can completely understand why the mps have written that letter. it is fairto mps have written that letter. it is fair to say thatjohn mps have written that letter. it is fair to say that john warboys' victims in london are particularly concerned because of the type of predatory behaviour he displayed. he ke pt predatory behaviour he displayed. he kept the names and addresses of his victims, the police found that afterwards. also he's a taxi driver, he often drove them home after his horrible offences were committed. i completely understand why mps in london have called for this restriction. 0n london have called for this restriction. on a wider point, we are questioning the parole board's decision generally to release this man, sucha decision generally to release this man, such a short time after his conviction. it really again shows
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that the cjs doesn't deal with rape and sexual violence very well. that's why we are supporting the judicial review of the two victims, saying we really want the parole board to look again at their decision and we want a mechanism to be able to review decisions like this, so this sort of thing can't happen again. is it correct that if that fails, the victims who are taking this action, calling for a victims judicial review, taking this action, calling for a victimsjudicial review, will taking this action, calling for a victims judicial review, will have to pay the cost? if, as we've heard on friday, the government take legal advice and decide not to pursue a judicial review based on limited chances of success, where does that leave them? i think those are two different things. there is a crowdfunding campaign to support the victims to bring theirjudicial review and we would encourage people to go to the crodeustice website. 0n the moj's judicial review, to go to the crodeustice website. 0n the moj'sjudicial review, they would have had tojudicial 0n the moj'sjudicial review, they would have had to judicial review its own department in many cases.
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the prison service who provided a lot of the evidence that went towards the decision of the parole board, are part of the ministry of justice, and the parole board is funded itself by the ministry of justice. it is understandable that it was difficult for the secretary of state forjustice to launch that judicial review. they haven't said it is something the victims shouldn't do. in parliament last week the secretary of state for justice said he completely understood why everyone was so concerned about release. bearing in mind he is one of the few people in the country who does know on what basis the parole board made the decision, then i think it's fair to say we are right to be bringing this judicial review. toby, can i get your response to crispin blunt saying the justice your response to crispin blunt saying thejustice secretary made the right decision, because it could have been a waste of taxpayers money of the legal challenge was pursued, if it had no reasonable chance of success. obviously i haven't had all of the information at my disposal
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that the secretary of state for justice has. but i think that one of the things that people want to see here is that there is at least some scrutiny of that decision. that would have been allowed by a judicial review. it's a real disgrace to our legal system that the victims themselves are now having to try and cobble money together in order to bring about a judicial review. i think that even if the normal level of chances that the ministry ofjustice would expect, it would have been in the public interest to give them every chance to bring about a judicial review, to see the basis and at least allows an scrutiny. i wish that the secretary of state for justice had come to a different decision but obviously i accept that
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he had information at his disposal i don't have. thank you forjoining us. some of your messages before we move on. you've been getting in touch and cervical cancer. this text says and 34, i've never been for a smear test and ignored all letters. she says my choice. i'm in two minds now while watching your show whether i should have won or not. i know i'm burying my head in the sand but i'm worried they will find something. —— whether i should have one of them or not. the test doesn't tell you whether you have cancer or not, it picks up abnormalities which can be investigated. this text says smear testing stops when you reach 60, i've been having them since i was 17. i'll miss the reassurance everything is ok. and this message, my reluctance to having a smear test is because i find it extremely uncomfortable and couldn't let the test continue. everybody is different. coming up, could be
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british economy perform better this year than many opponents of brexit have predicted? let's get the latest weather update. it's certainly been a wintry weekend. yesterday we had some heavy snowfall and also heavy rain in the south—west which caused a few flooding problems. it's all changed. if we take a look at the forecast, over the next few days things will be turning milder. they're still quite a lot of lying snow out there at the moment. this is the scene ca ptu red at the moment. this is the scene captured by one of our weather watchers in nottinghamshire. some icy stretches around but as temperatures are on the rise a lot of that snow is set to thaw. let's compare temperatures yesterday, many places struggled to get much above freezing. by tomorrow many of us will be a good 10 degrees or more warmer. that's down to the fact the cold air that's been in charge is getting pushed away towards the north—east, replaced by much milder air sweeping north—east, replaced by much milder airsweeping in north—east, replaced by much milder air sweeping in from the south—west. that is bringing a fair amount of
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cloud but it's not a bad day. the cloud but it's not a bad day. the cloud is set to thin and break allowing some sunshine to emerge, particularly towards the east of higher ground. eastern scotland also seeing a bit of sunshine later on. 0ne seeing a bit of sunshine later on. one or two showers in the western half of scotland but perhaps an isolated showers in northern ireland and north—west england. a lot of dry weather, less windy and a bit warmer thanit weather, less windy and a bit warmer than it has been. heading further south, fairly cloudy conditions for the midlands and southern england. we've lost the rain we had first thing this morning. it's looking largely dry and quite bright. fairly dry, light winds than we've seen recently too. as temperatures rise we are set to see more of that snow thawing out. it's going to be a mild night. temperatures should rise as we see the south—westerly winds picking up. turning squally and gusty by tomorrow morning, with the arrival of some rain. it will be a
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frost free morning but a pretty u nsettled frost free morning but a pretty unsettled day. we've got the wind and these bands of rain crossing south—eastwards across the country. they will be followed by something sunnier but also further squally show was moving in from the north—west. let's take a look at the temperatures across the board. we are looking at double figures through the day. the unsettled theme continues into wednesday. another band of heavy rain and strong squally winds moving eastwards across the country. there could be some disruptive winds in the north for a time. a return to sunshine and showers behind that. looking ahead to the end of the week, staying fairly unsubtle. friday a dry day with temperatures just down a notch. certainly nothing as cold as we saw through the course of last week as temperatures are much milder over the next few days. hello it's monday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm tina daheley. too embarrassed to go for a smear test, the danger so many women take
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putting themselves at risk of cervical cancer. we are really worried that if things don't turn around, and fortunately, more women will be diagnosed and sadly lose their lives. the key thing is that this is a cancer that is preve nta ble. this is a cancer that is preventable. more turmoil for ukip. the particles are ‘s debited leader resigns and calls for henry bolton to step down as leader. we will have all the details. and a pioneering gene therapy is cleared for use in britain. it could help save the lives of children born with a deadly immune disorder. we will be talking to the parents of a child with a fa u lty to the parents of a child with a faulty gene. good morning. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of todays news. the head of the army will warn today that britain's military risks falling behind potential enemies unless it gets additional investment. in a speech to defence experts, general sir nick carter is expected to say that russia now has superior battlefield capabilities to the uk, and poses a significant threat in terms of cyber warfare. his comments have been authorised
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by the defence secretary. a charity says one in three young women in the uk are embarrassed to attend smear tests for cervical cancer, because of body image issues. more than 2000 women, aged between 25 and 35, were surveyed by jo's cervical cancer trust. the charity says it is worried about the impact on screening rates, which have fallen to a 20—year low. ukip's deputy leader has resigned in protest over henry bolton's decision not to step down as party leader. she has beenjoined byjohn bickley, ukip's immigrations boatswain. henry bolton has refused to step down, despite a vote of no—confidence the national executive. the former treasury minister and remain supporter, lord 0'neill, says the british economy should perform better this year than many opponents of brexit had predicted.
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he said the uk's growth forecasts were likely to be upgraded — because of increased demand from china, america and continental europe. detectives are continuing to investigate the fatal stabbing of an 8—year—old girl in the west midlands. mylee billingham was named by police as the schoolgirl who died at an address near walsall on saturday. a 54—year—old man, understood to be herfather, was arrested in connection with the attack. he remains in a critical condition in hospital. the authorities in mexico say more than 25 thousand people were murdered in the country last year — about 500 every week. the majority were in states where drug cartels are deeply entrenched. but mexico city and the tourist areas of baja california also saw murder rates rise 400%. the us federal government will remain closed today after the senate delayed a vote on a budget measure, which would have allowed civil servants to go back to work. democrats want president trump to negotiate over immigration, but republicans say no deal is possible while federal government
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services are closed. the last government shutdown was in 2013, and lasted for 16 days. gary 0ldman has cemented his status as favourite to win an oscar this year. he won the award for best aactor at the screen actors guild awards overnight. it's for his role as sir winston churchill in the darkest hour. churchill reminds us we make a living by what we get and make a life with by we give. and you have given me an enormous honour, and i am so deeply, deeply honoured and proud to receive this magnificent award. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30pm. lots of you have been getting in touch on the stories we're talking about this morning. use the hashtag #victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.
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we have a text about lithium batteries, we were discussing the dangers of children swallowing them. this says, it is really thoughtful you highlighting the risks, i am helping a family that lost a three—year—old child who died after swallowing a flat battery unknowingly. it went and diagnosed until she died and a postmortem was performed. the problem is that it needs more awareness and publicity. i hope you can continue to work on this. here's some sport now with holly hamilton. roger federer is thorugh to the quarter finals — beocming the oldest man ot reach the last eight since ken rosewell in 1977 at the grand age of 36. he beat hungary's marton fucsovics in straight sets — making quick work of him too in under two hours. he'll face czech tomas berdych next. it is their 26th meeting. we have had some good ones over the years,
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going back all the way to the 0lympic going back all the way to the olympic games in athens in 2004. i am looking forward to playing against him. he seems in good shape, he is over his back issues and that isa he is over his back issues and that is a good thing. novak djokovic is in action right now, and he's having a tough time against heung chung. the korean has taken the first set against the six—time winner in melbourne. meanwhile in the women's draw top seed simona halep has eased into the last eight with victory overjapan's naomi 0saka. the romanian came through a tight first set before racing away to a 6—3, 6—2 victory — showing no sign of the ankle injury she suffered in the first round. she'll face the winner of the all—czech contest between sixth seed karolina pliskova and 20th seed barbora strycova. harry kane struck his 99th premier league goal for tottenham, but couldn't prevent them from losing ground in the race for the top four as his spurs side drew 1—1 at southampton. an own goal from tottenham defender davinson sanchez gave saints the lead in the opening 15 minutes. then came kane's equaliser.
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spurs miss out on the chance to go level with fourth—placed liverpool who take on swansea tonight. commentary of that game on bbc radio five live from seven o'clock. you know, you watch everybody else play and win and then you have to do the same. that makes it more difficult. 0bviously the same. that makes it more difficult. obviously there are still a very long way to go, lots of ups and downs, i am sure. wejust need to keep working hard, keep fighting. that is obviously the aim. mark allen hopes his masters victory over kyren wilson will lead to "bigger and better things." allen's10—7 victory makes him the first northern irishman to win the masters since dennis taylor in 1987. "it's 40 years since alex higgins first won the trophy to bring it back to the country, that's what i did it for." kinnego this is his first success of
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one of snooker's triple crown events. i felt calm all week except for the first session today. i was on edge. as the match went on, i got stronger. i felt more at ease with myself. yeah, i am just very, very pleased to be on the right end of it for a change. and fresh from her fourth placed finish at the final skeleton world cup of the season in germany at the weekend lizzy yarnold will lead team gb's skeleton team at the pyeongchang winter games. yarnold is aiming to become the first british winter 0lympian to retain her title, with her success in sochi four years ago. she'll bejoined by laura deas, dom parsons and jerry rice to compete in south korea next month. that's all your sport for now. i'll have the latest at 10.30am. thank you. i want to get some more of your comments before i move on. we have been talking about women being too embarrassed about their bodies to go for a smear test. dawn
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tweeted to say, a smear test saved my life. please, have it done, quick, easy and a possible life—saver. bill says it affects families through wives, mothers, daughters etc. don't avoid it. anonymous, my ex—girlfriend of 27 yea rs anonymous, my ex—girlfriend of 27 years didn't know what a smear test was. better awareness is needed. finally, anne on facebook says she had a smear test and it showed an abnormality, which turned out to be cervical erosion. i was having bleeding after sex and was due a smear, so mentioned it to the nurse. they also found a cyst on my cervix. please go for your spears, ladies. —— smears. the former treasury minister and remain supporter, lord 0'neill, has told the bbc he think the british economy should perform better this year than many opponents of brexit had predicted. he believes that uk growth forecasts will be upgraded — because of increased demand from china, america and continental europe. it comes as a survey of mps suggests many of them changed their views on the impact of brexit.
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the majority of conservative mps now agree with theresa may that britain must leave the single market — but the vast majority ofjeremy corbyn's mps disagree with him that this is the way to go. lord 0'neill said that the economic performance post wrecks it might surprise many. i certainly wouldn't have thought the uk economy would be as robust as it currently seems. but thatis as robust as it currently seems. but that is because it looks to me like some parts of the country, led by the northwest, are actually doing way better than people seem to realise or appreciate, as well as this crucial fact that the rest of the world is doing way better than many people would have thought a year ago. it makes it easierfor the uk. if this turns out to be borne out with more and more data in
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coming months, the brexiteers are going to be like a cat with the cream, they will say, i told you so, which is ridiculous. let's talk now to labour mp heidi alexander who is campaigning for the labour party to push for the uk to remain in the single market. anne—marie trevelyan is a pro—brexit conservative mp. good morning. that is a message of optimism from lord 0'neill? good morning. that is a message of optimism from lord o'neill? what we have seen with respect to the economy as the uk going from the fastest—growing in the g7 to the slowest growing. we are actually being dragged along by the strength of the european economy at the moment. we have seen the pound devalued. we have not taken a hit to exports as much as we perhaps predicted. there are underlying problems there. notjust about europe, he is saying britain's forecasts are going to get graded as china and america show increased
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activity, it is a global picture?” think there is increasing uncertainty among business, business leaders decided to delay investment decisions. i think it is incredibly important that we stay in a european customs union said that we have tariff free trade on goods within the european union and because services, financial services, insurance companies, are so critical to our economy. it accounts for 80% of the service industry. we need to find a way to ensure that those businesses can continue to trade freely and easily with other european countries. for me, that means staying in the single market and staying in the european economic area. i guess you share that optimism? it is lovely to hear lord o'neill talking much more positively than he was during the brexit campaign back in 2016. i think those of us who have been here for a long time and have seen that, that opening up of markets, the opportunity for global britain to be a real thing within the trade, i am
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a real thing within the trade, i am a north—east mp and the devaluation of the pound has been huge for exports, we have export markets opening all over the world. while meeting the democratic mandate to leave the eu, which is what the british people gave us the most clear directions to do, staying within the customs union is not possible. heidi, you are shaking head throughout. we will come back to you. let's find out what the picture is amongst both of your party is and how views have changed. anand menon. could you talk us through the most significant shifts? the most significant shifts? the most significant figures are since last year, a large number of conservative mps have come to believe that staying in the single market is incompatible with brexit. 40% last year, now it is 70%. on the labour benches, around 90% of labour mps say they would like to see britain stay in a single market and think it would be compatible with brexit,
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putting them at odds with the formal position of their leadership. when it comes to the labour party, as you said, the survey shows labour mps are deeply againstjeremy corbyn on the matter of the single market, but also very concerned about our economic future? there is a very clear difference across the aisle. both sides of the house are not exactly rosy about prospects over the next year, but it is very clear that over 80% of conservative mps think the economy will do well over the next ten years after brexit, whereas only a small number of labour mps share that optimism. you gave mps a choice of four different types of brexit to choose from. what we re types of brexit to choose from. what were they and what do the results show? it ranged from remaining in the single market and customs union to leaving with no deal. labour mps overwhelmingly favour staying in a single market. conservative mps have come around the prime minister's thinking, that we should leave the single market and customs union. 0n
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that score, she seems to have the backing of her. they also vary significantly on whether we should favour no deal over a bad deal. what did you find? significantly more conservative mps think a no deal is a acceptable outcome. very few labour mps do. it seems like the government itself is less keen on no deal, there is less talk about it being better than a bad deal than before the election. thank you. heidi, iwant before the election. thank you. heidi, i want to come back to you. i wa nt to heidi, i want to come back to you. i want to talk about some of those findings. jeremy corbyn has been pretty clear in his view that leaving the eu means leaving the single market. it looks like 90% of labour mps disagree with that. why so much opposition? if you look at how you might stay in the single market, remaining part of the european economic area, essentially being a bit like norway, so countries like norway, iceland, lichtenstein, they are not in the eu and are not subject to the treaty on
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the function of the european union, but they are part of the european economic area and they can trade freely and easily with other european countries. if you listen to what labour party members are saying, they overwhelmingly want to stay in the single market and customs union. if you listen to what the cbi is saying about staying in a customs union... that is at odds with the leader of the party, isn't that a big problem if you are not united and the opposition needs to have a united stand going into crucial negotiations if they want to impact what is happening next we've got a big problem for the country at the moment and it is incumbent on parliament irrespective of their party to do what they believe is right for the country and to protect the economy. 0n those figures we were talking about earlier, even if 10% of the conservative party in parliament believed that we should stay in the single market, and if they were minded to vote that way in the
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division lobbies, then theresa may's government could be defeated on this. what i sense from conservative mps, especially what happened just before christmas when the government we re before christmas when the government were defeated on the eu withdrawal bill, is that a number of anne—marie's colleagues are starting to think really really hard about the impact and their constituents aboutjobs, investment, the impact and their constituents about jobs, investment, livelihoods. i think this year we could see some very, very interesting folks coming up. anne-marie, is it a case of hope over actual analysis when it comes to the conservative party? if there has been a significant shift against staying in the single market amongst tory mps, is that the genuine belief held in the party or is it about party loyalty? the eu withdrawal bill went through the house with only one amendment. i hunted members we re only one amendment. i hunted members were put the conservative party and
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mps have supported what the prime minister put forwards. it is very clear, we cannot stay in the single market and customs union without also maintaining freedom of movement. the british people were absolutely clear. the challenge of a referendum and its bluntness is that the message was very clear. we want to come out of the eu because we no longer want to be under eu jurisdiction nor to have this free movement of people. we want to take control of what we are doing. the reality is we cannot just revert to what was the case, we have to find a way forward. the eu don't want no deal, we don't want no deal. we have to find a way forward is which is a new positive relationship. emmanuel macron has said over the weekend that conditions for accessing the single market are strict and non—negotiable. single market are strict and non-negotiable. it's very clear, if you stay in the single market you have to maintain freedom of
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movement, therefore we cannot stay in the single market. the british people were very clear that that is not what they want to continue to have. we want control of immigration and therefore need to step out of the single market. ed vaizey said yesterday that the government is now considering staying in the cost union. it's changing on a day—to—day basis. we're not that i'm aware of. the word single market were not on the ballot paper in the referendum. the words immigration were not on the ballot paper. i remember the now foreign secretary borisjohnson running around the country with a big red bus claiming that there would be £350 million extra per week to go into the nhs. if a tiny fraction of people who voted leave voted for that reason, then there never has been a mandated be doing the sort brexit theresa may is currently going along the lines of. we will bring some breaking news of
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a union. the duke and duchess of york are delighted to announce the engagement of princess eugenie to mr jack brooks bank. her royal highness and mr brooks bank became engaged in nicaragua earlier this month. the wedding will take place in the autumn of 2018. further details to be announced in due course. ukip's leader henry bolton is under increasing pressure after the party's national executive committee unanimously backed a vote of no confidence in him last night. this morning his deputy margot parker and the party's immigration and integration spokesmanjohn bickley have resigned calling for mr bolton to step aside. the row began after his former girlfriend she sent texts saying prince harry's fiancee meghan markle would "taint" the royal family, leading to accusations of racism. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is in westminsterfor us. what can you tell us? is this really
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the end of ukip? that is the big question. at the heart of it is a bloke you would be forgiven for not knowing who he was. henry bolton, the leader of ukip for the last couple of months. he previously spent time in the police and military. he got an 0be for his services to international security. he then popped up in politics as ukip's umpteen leader in not a very long time. he quickly found himself in these shenanigans involving him, his ex—governor and those text messages, facing all sorts of people in the party saying he should walk the plank. then along came a meeting
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of the party's nec where unanimously there was the verdict he would go. there was actually one guy in the meeting who said he shouldn't, mr bolton himself. he says he's going to stick around. then this morning we've had two further resignations, margot parker the deputy leader, mep for the east midlands. john bickley beat integration and immigration spokesperson, they both said his judgment is shot through and he should disappear as leader. he is absolutely determined to stick around. what happens now is that there is going to be an emergency meeting in about four weeks' time, where any member of the party can turn up and have a vote, providing 250 in total turn up the meeting will be deemed legitimate. it's now the case that both sides in the argument, those who are supportive of mr bolton and those who aren't, have to try and persuade as many
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people as possible to give up a day of their weekend to come along and cast a vote. that will determine whether he carries on leading ukip or doesn't. fascinating stuff. thank you. still to come. the growing problem of homelessness. the number of people sleeping rough in england has risen for a sixth year in a row. from twitter, facebook, snapchat and instagram — has social media had its day? a new study reckons we're falling out of favour with social media, because sites aren't regulated enough, they don't do enough to prevent bullying, and are failing to tackle the rise of fake news. the survey, by edelman, taps in to a lot of concerns about the effect social media has on young people — from exacerbating worries about body image, to increasing feelings of depression, loneliness and anxiety. amy 0rben is a social media psychologist at the university of oxford. good morning. are you surprised by what we've heard today?”
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good morning. are you surprised by what we've heard today? i don't think i am. what we've been having in the last few months is a fierce public debate about social media. these numbers that trust has been decreasing and really surprising. naturally that is the outcome of such a debate. i guess what we think is worrying here at the university of oxford is that this worry doesn't seem to be founded on evidence. what's factored into that debate? if you're saying this is inevitable after that discussion, is it fake news, is it an overload of information that people are getting? is it being more aware of fake news being out there after the american election and the stories we are hearing on a day—to—day basis?” think we have a couple of debates going on at the moment. we have this problem with fake news and the election coverage. this has been
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heavily publicised in the media. we also have this debate about the well—being effects of social media, especially young children. that has been fuelled by a couple of very outspoken psychologists who published a book about these effects. but when we actually look at the data, the effects are actually very, very small. we wouldn't say that social media can decrease well—being at the moment. do you think we are going in a cycle ? do you think we are going in a cycle? what will happen next? at the same time we are hearing that before it was newspapers are being killed off, traditional tv networks won't survive in the future, news outlets that is. today we've heard the trust in traditional media and tv has jumped toa in traditional media and tv has jumped to a six—year high.” in traditional media and tv has jumped to a six-year high. i think with every new technology we have an u pta ke cycle. with every new technology we have an uptake cycle. at the beginning people are very interested, but then
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quickly people become worried about new technologies. that's happened for many hundreds of years. in the 1500 with the printing press we had alarms about information overload. i think it's quite a natural progression, that people are becoming worried about new technologies and probably in the next few years that will balance out again. i think there will be peaks and troughs about trust in new technologies and i guess we are currently in one of those troughs. why is this more pronounced with young people? one tenth of young adults say they've quit facebook in the last year according to this research. i don't know if that's to do with trust. young people are incredibly volatile in what they wa nt to incredibly volatile in what they want to use and what social media platforms they want to use. what we are seeing is that with grandmothers and mothers and parents and teachers being on platforms like facebook, young people are moving to other
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platforms. i don't know if that can be used as evidence that they trust social media less. i think it shows that they are the first to move to novel platforms where they can hang out with their own generation. interesting that last month facebook said for the first time using the site can lead to unhappiness, especially if you're scrolling through friends' updates without interacting. yes, that's research done at facebook. we do find that certain types of social media use might be more detrimental to well—being. i think this is the first step to providing some really important nuance in the debate. at the moment we are debating about whether social media increases or decreases well—being. there are so many different types of social media use and different contexts and ways that we need to actually start disentangling these are facts. i
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guess facebook has started this debate in the public at the moment which has been present in academia for quite a long time. do you think tighter regulation would mean more trust? i don't think i can give an opinion on that. i think naturally that would be where we are going at the moment. i think what is important is that we do more research in the area so that the public and policymakers can really make their decisions on strong evidence and notjust public debates. thank you forjoining us this morning. lots of you have been getting in touch about cervical cancer. this e—mail says, i'm 53 and have only ever had one smear test. i ignored all reminder letters for similar reasons to other viewers. too busy, too embarrassed. in march
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2017 after having sciatica symptoms for 18 months i was diagnosed with cervical cancer. the tumour was very large and had spread. needless to say my prognosis was poor. in the following months i've undergone chemotherapy, radiotherapy, with all the side effects. although the treatment has managed to control the disease it can't be cleared and i've recently been told i only have months to live. this is all my own fault because i was stupid enough to think it wouldn't happen to me. but a smear test today and attend regularly. the duke and duchess of york have announced the engagement of princess use —— princess eugenie to mrjack brooksbank. time for the latest news — here's annita. the bbc news headlines this morning. princess eugenie has become engaged to her long—term boyfriend jack
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brooksbank. the couple became engaged in nicaragua earlier this month. the wedding will take place in the autumn of this year at st george's chapel in windsor. the head of the army is warning that britain's military risks falling behind potential enemies unless it gets additional investment. in a speech to defence experts, general sir nick carter is expected to say that russia now has superior battlefield capabilities to the uk, and poses a significant threat in terms of cyber warfare. the former treasury minister and remain supporter, lord 0'neill, says the british economy should perform better this year than many opponents of brexit had predicted. he said the uk's growth forecasts were likely to be upgraded — because of increased demand from china, america and continental europe. is's front bench have resigned, putting further pressure on henry bolton. he is refusing to quit over racist remarks made by his former girlfriend, despite a vote of
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no—confidence in leadership. deputy leader margot parker stepped down, followed byjohn leader margot parker stepped down, followed by john bickley. a charity says one in three young women in the uk are embarrassed to attend smear tests for cervical cancer, because of body image issues. more than 2000 women, aged between 25 and 35, were surveyed by jo's cervical cancer trust. the charity says it is worried about the impact on screening rates, which have fallen to a 20—year low. breaking news to bring you, a third ukip frontbencher has resigned, over leader henry bolton's unwillingness to stand down. it comes after the deputy leader quits as well after henry bolton refused to step down after a vote of no—confidence. we will bring you more on that a little bit later. first, let's get some sport. coming up later, familiarity will not breed contempt for roger
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federer. he charged into the quarterfinal with a 6—4, 7—6, 6—2 win injust over two hours. he will face long—time rival tomas berdych for the 26th time on wednesday. six time champion novak djokovic is two sets down to south korea's hyeon chung. mark allen hopes his masters victory over kyren wilson will lead to bigger and better things. his 10-7 to bigger and better things. his 10—7 victory makes in the first northern irishman to win the masters since dennis taylor back in 1987. and with alexis sanchez set to join my just united and with alexis sanchez set to join myjust united from arsenal in a swa p myjust united from arsenal in a swap deal in the coming days, he has been spotted with the number seven shirt. he will pass mkhitaryan on the m6. he heads to arsenal in a deal between the clubs. and fresh from her fourth placed finish at the final skeleton world cup of the season in germany at the weekend lizzy yarnold will lead team gb's skeleton team at the pyeongchang winter games.
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yarnold is aiming to become the first british winter 0lympian to retain her title, with her success in sochi four years ago. the number of people sleeping rough in england has risen for the past six years in a row. last january it was found that more than 4000 people had bedded down outside during the previous year — and on thursday we find out whether that number has risen yet again. the winter months can be deadly for those forced to sleep outside, and many rely on emergency night shelters when temperatures drop below zero. but not all small have these shelters, particularly in rural areas. reporter seb chowdry from the bbc's inside out west programme has spent the night in weston super mare, in the south—west on england, where the nearest shelter is in bristol, 18 miles away. well, we've got a freezing night ahead across north somerset, and on the coastal fringes temperatures probably about —2 to —4, and there may well be
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some fog around as well. well, that's not good news, especially as i'm going to try to sleep out tonight in weston—super—mare. it's one of many places in our region where there are visibly more homeless people. we'll know exactly how bad the situation is when the latest rough sleeper figures are published later this week. and, while we all might walk past homeless people, how many of us really think about what it's like to be on the streets at night? he was froze out on the stretcher, he was gone. he froze? he froze, yeah. during the night. hypothermia. it's freezing. nothing could prepare me for what to expect. i don't know how long till sunrise, but this is really, really, really near impossible, it really is. i don't know how they do it. could i make it to the morning? it's just after six
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o'clock in the evening here in weston—super—mare. i'm told its not a great place to be sleeping rough on the streets, because of the terrible temperatures. i have the luxury of actually going home any time i want to, these guys don't. and in that victorian shelterjust down the road there are a few of the guys who are sleeping there, i'm just going to go and introduce myself. hello. hello there. how are you? bbc? this shelter is being shared by steve, martin and kev. kev, what's it like at night here? freezing. is it? we just have to manage. yeah? yeah. get into blankets and sleeping bags. how long have you been doing this? seven months.
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seven months? yeah. seven months in this? it's a familiar story. steve's been sleeping rough in weston for the past nine months. what's it like living like this? it's not very good, but it's life and you make it the best you can. it must feel like everyday is like this horrible cycle that you're in? i don't even want to wake up some mornings. i don't want to wake up, i just want to end. oh, god. i can't take no more now. i'm still trying, but... anyone says, i'd cope, you'd survive, yeah, but... steve, martin and kev are being helped by local people who bring them hot drinks and food. they've also set up a facebook page in the last few weeks to raise
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awareness and encourage more people to offer support. joseph, hello, you're helping these guys out? yeah, i've got warm food. you've got warm food? do you think this is a problem that's ever going to get resolved? they easily put things on to attract people to weston and they try to hide the other side of weston, and there's things they can do, but i don't feel they do do. everyone deserves a chance to be in a house and warm. should be in a house. not be out here in the cold. it really does upset you, doesn't it, joe? yeah. it's not right. it's eight o'clock. the group meet around this time each night before heading to different parts of the town, taking supplies to those in need. hi, heidi, i'm seb. you guys have come to help?
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there's no night shelter here — the closest is bristol. north somerset council estimates the number of rough sleepers in this area is seven, but the volunteers say it's much higher. we've calculated there's about 20 to 30 of them sleeping rough. as high as that? yes. so what have they got wrong that you've seen? they're just not going out and doing what we're doing, having a search and finding them more. they're just waiting for them to go into the council office, but it can be daunting for them to go into that council office sometimes. right. it needs sorting now. as val takes me around the high street and boulevard, i'm amazed to see there's even someone sleeping outside the council offices. do you want to go back up and get your food and that, yeah? hello, what are you doing here? do you want some biscuits?
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in the few hours we spend walking around, we see about ten rough sleepers in just a very small area. it's coming up to midnight or so. i've just left val in the town centre, i'm heading down to the victorian shelter where kevin, martin and steve are setting down for the night. i'll be sleeping over there. i'vejust got to hope i can make it through the night, that's all. when i get back, steve is struggling because of the cold. you need to cover yourself up, my friend. that's not properly... i'm 0k. tell me about your old life, steve, what was that like? it was ok to start off with. i married and had kids. you were married, were you? yeah. how long were you married for? ten years.
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really? do your kids keep in touch? no. never see my kids. do they know you're here? no. do you miss them? yeah. do you think about your old life? yeah, course, every time. i always see my children... do you? yeah, in my mind. steve, i don't know how you do this. it's... it's seriously, seriously cold. i'm not too bad now, now i'm inside this sleeping bag. it feels like i'm living back in a house again, nice and warm, in my bed. is that how you picture it? yeah. this is my home. if i could rent this off the council, i'd rent it and i'd block it all off and put a door there so i can shut the door and just have my own little space.
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at around 2am, i attempt to settle down. this is about the only way i can keep warm here. this is, this is freezing. no matter how hard i try, i just can't get to sleep. it's about...
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4.30 at the moment. it's impossible, absolutely impossible. i've got so many layers on but it's just getting colder and colder. i think it's about four hours to go until sunrise. some of those guys in there, they've got terrible coughs, they've been coughing all night. absolutely freezing. it's near impossible to survive this. i'm going to go back in there and try to sleep a little bit at least. the number of rough sleepers across the region has almost doubled in the last four years. when it gets below freezing for more than three nights on the trot, emergency accommodation should be offered to anyone forced to sleep outside. one of the reasons is to try and prevent deaths, but we've been told in the last year alone at least 15 people have died on the streets.
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so it's ten to seven, most of the time there was freezing fog around, i'll show you on the top of the car, look at that, a lot of frost there. it's notjust me who's had trouble tonight. even for martin, who's used to this, sleeping in these conditions is a struggle. you 0k, martin? how was the night? cold. it was cold, wasn't it? that'sjust a mild night last night. that was a mild one? not as cold as it normally is. martin, there's a few guys who've died recently, haven't they? yeah, there was one up there in the next shelter up, he was froze out on the stretcher, he was gone. he froze? yeah, he froze, yeah. during the night. hypothermia, i think.
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that must be scary? yeah, it is. you've got to brave it out, because i've got no choice. with wintry weather like this, it's hardly surprising it takes its toll. steve is at a point where he's desperate for help. i'm too old for all this. i need help with my drink, because i'm an alcoholic. i need help with my eyesight, to get my eyesight back so i can see what i'm doing. i don't want to live like this no more. thank you. look after yourself. i will. for me, luckily, this was just one night. see you, boys. see you. it was really difficult to say goodbye to steve and martin there.
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i've really bonded with them, i've been here 14 hours, got to know them, spent the night in that shelter over there. it's really difficult, it's stressful when you don't know who mightjust creep up on you, and what really struck me is how easily you canjust lose morale. you know? and because of the cold, and because of the just intense hopelessness, you can just lose the will to do anything the next day. it's a very, very, very sad situation. that report from seb chowdry from the bbc's inside out west programme. well, north somerset council which covers the area told us: they also told us that they have discussed the possibility
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of setting up a night shelter. the government told us they are providing over £1 billion pounds by 2020 to reduce all forms of homelessness and rough sleeping. i'm joined now by a spokesperson for the homeless charity crisis. i want to get your response to the film. the homeless charity crisis. i want to get your response to the filmm is depressingly depicting the picture across the uk. grassley pig has significantly increased since 2010. across britain we have an estimate of 4000 people sleeping rough on any given night —— rough sleeping has significantly increased since 2010. a lot of people and picked up by official statistics.
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that was weston—super—mare, what we know about the national picture? nationally we see homelessness increasing everywhere, particularly high demand areas where housing is a problem. london is an obvious point but other parts of the country such as manchester, homelessness on the streets has increased. it's the same in scotland and wales. the lead calls of homelessness at the moment is the end of a privately rented tenancy. it's the situation of secure housing we have across the uk at the moment. what about the challenges when it comes to engaging rough sleepers? people watching at home, having heard that statement from the council saying we tried to offer help but some people refuse it, why is that? in some situations, when people are homeless, it can be more complex than others. not everybody sleeping rough has very complex needs and actually they have a significant problem with housing and they just need
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a significant problem with housing and theyjust need to be rehoused into permanent accommodation. for others with more complex needs, they need a really good package of support. at the moment that's not necessarily available. we've seen funding cut significantly from the support services. even if they are offered a place in a hostel there is not necessarily the money there to provide them the support they need. the history of that experience again means people may be distrust the system. what about the government saying they are spending £1 billion to help homeless people? we seen some really good investments in the recent budgets both in terms of targeted at rough sleepers with high—level needs and those who literally need to get back into private renting. that's a really good step and we seen a manifesto commitment to end rough sleeping by 2027. what we really need is a more fundamental shift in how the country response to homelessness and for it to be much more rapid than it currently is, and housing led. it's about people being brought into
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their own permanent accommodation. world cup winnerjimmie armfield has died at the age of 82. he was also pa rt died at the age of 82. he was also part of the victorious world cup winning squad in 1966. he was diagnosed with cancer for a second time last year. there's to be another royal wedding in windsor this year — princess eugenie hasjust got engaged to jack brookshank. 0ur royal correspondent jonny diamond is here. that's two royal weddings this year. there were rumours of an engagement in late 2016, now buckingham palace
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has confirmed it. princess eugenie will marry her long—term boyfriend jack brooksbank sometime in the autumn at st george's chapel. the same chapel which will see the wedding of prince harry and meghan markle in the spring. a busy time for the royals. is it significant it's going to be in the same venue? it's probably about the right size venue. it's probably about the right size venue. it's going to take around 450 guests. given a princess eugenie is the eighth in line to the throne it wouldn't have been a fast wedding at westminster abbey. it will be a rather smaller affair. still fairly large and fairly heavily covered, certainly by royal watchers and people interested in the royal family. there will no doubt be comparisons. there will be. the couple have met, we believe, there have been talk of double dates. princess eugenie probably hasn't beenin princess eugenie probably hasn't been in the news as much as some of the other royals. she doesn't receive money from the public purse,
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she doesn't attend that many public functions. she has a full—time job, she works as associate director at an art gallery in central london and carries on in a relatively normal fashion, leading a relatively normal life. she's not one of the high—profile royals but someone most people know about. one final question to ask you, how much do we know about her fiance? we know something. he's privately educated, didn't go to university, works as the manager of a mayfair nightclub, a place called mahiki. they've been going out for seven years. they met in switzerland in a ski resort. rumours of engagement for some time now, confirmed now by buckingham palace. thank you for bringing us all the details. a pioneering gene therapy has been cleared for use in britain — which could help to save the lives of children born with a deadly immune disorder.
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it is the first gene therapy ever to be made made available on the nhs — and will give children the chance to have their faulty dna rewritten. if left untreated, children with this gene mutation will die before they reach school age. the plan is for hospitals to start offering the therapy next month. maria and stuart vinen's son henry was born with the faulty gene. he has survived thanks to a bone marrow transfusion from his brother, which means he now isn't eligible for this treatment. iimagine you i imagine you have mixed feelings about the news that this is their appeal is now going to be offered here. i think it's really get. actually we were lucky, we had a match with our son 0scar. for those people who haven't got a match and sat waiting watching their children deteriorate, i think it means they feel hope now that their child can
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have a chance at a normal life without having to wait for that all—important without having to wait for that all—importa nt match. without having to wait for that all-important match. can you tell us more about henry's condition? what is it, how has it affected him? he has severe combined immune deficiency. they can't fight off colds. you wouldn't know when they we re colds. you wouldn't know when they were born that they had it. as time goes on they get more and more infections that they can't fight off. the only cure is a bone marrow transplant or gene therapy. what happened after that diagnosis? because this is incredibly rare, i understand it was difficult and very upsetting in those stages when you weren't aware of what the condition was before it was diagnosed. for us, henry is obviously my second baby, and he was persistently poorly. at
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three days old he had an eye infection, then he developed a cold which developed into a chest infection. i kept saying there's something wrong. after about six weeks we went to the hospital after much persistence and they said we think you may have meningitis. he had to have a lumbar puncture. after three days they said he'll be ok, he can go home, his cells are slightly abnormal but it's something we might review and a couple of months. two days later he had really large ulcers in his mouth, the size of a 50p piece. they said actually maybe you're depressed, maybe there's nothing wrong with him and it's in your head. how did that make you feel? i was so upset. at first you almost embarrassed, and then actually i thought, i'm a mum. it's
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my son, there's something wrong. we ended up going back to the hospital and demanding that someone see him who was suitably qualified. within the space of under 24 hours i was being told to sit down with my husband and we think your son has got this rare condition, he will need a bone marrow transplant. to actually get a diagnosis is incredibly distressing. to convince people you're not going crazy, your child is consistently poorly, it's hard. henry has now been given a bone marrow donation by his older brother 0scar. it's not a complete cure, is it? for henry, he was very, very poorly. he was intensive care which meant he didn't have time for gene therapy. he doesn't actually have... his immune system cells
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don't work well. he has to have an expensive treatment weekly or biweekly. that replaces the cells he won't have a game back from having the transplant. thank you all for joining us on the programme this morning. let's return to that breaking news but the blackpool and england football greatjimmy armfield has died at the age of 82. we arejoined from armfield has died at the age of 82. we are joined from the sport newsroom with david who can tell us how significant he was at blackpool fc. he was extremely significant at blackpool fc where he was a one club man, playing over 600 games for blackpool over a 17 year period, having made his debut against portsmouth. not just at
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having made his debut against portsmouth. notjust at blackpool where he was a legendary figure but he was also part of the england world cup winning squad in 1966. he didn't play in that tournament because of injury but he did receive his medal many years later in 2009 and will always be remembered for both an international perspective and a club perspective. there was a stand named after him at blackpool and a statue erected in his honour. he went on to manage in football as well. replacing the legendary brian clough at leeds united. he led them to the european cup final in 1975. he was inducted into blackpool's hall of fame and was also a bbc summariser, working for bbc five live for well over 30 years, most recently in january 2000 and live for well over 30 years, most recently injanuary 2000 and seven. the tributes are flowing in already. jimmy armfield has died at the age of 82 —— january 2007. thank you for your company today.
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bbc newsroom live is coming up next. have a good day. a much milder day to day for many of us than we've seen recently. that's thanks to this milder air replacing the colder air coming in from the south—west. today is an improving picture with heavy outbreaks of rain. becoming increasingly dry and patchy. scattered showers in northern ireland and into north—west england and wales. dry, bright weather with good spells of sunshine. breezy in the north with highs of 11 degrees. clear spells allow the temperatures to fall away
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in initially and then it will turn wet and windy from the west. most areas staying frost free but they could be a few spots rerelease that could be a few spots rerelease that could wake up to a touch of frost. a mild the day than today. the mildest day of the week i think. it doesn't come with wall—to—wall sunshine, it will be a cloudy start with patchy rain. heaviest in the north, a windy day across the board. it will brighten up with highs of 14 degrees celsius. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11.00: britain's military risks falling behind that of its enemies without extra money —
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the head of the british army warns in a rare public intervention. three of ukip's mps resign in protest over henry bolton's decision not to step down as party leader. an economic boost over brexit — the government's former treasury minister, himself a remainer, says earlier pessimistic predictions may not be as feared due to global economic growth. if this turns out to be borne out with more and more data in the coming months, the brexiteers will be like the cat with the cream, they'll be like there you go, i told you so, which of course is ridiculous. in the us, much of the federal government remains in shut down, after the senate postponed a crucial budget vote.

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